Article Series

About Transportation Resources – Here is some Information

Article submitted by the staff with Seniors Resource Guide.com. Seniors Resource Guide is a network of websites that shares news, events and resources important to seniors, boomers, family members and professionals.
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Transportation programs can be fee-based, discounted or free depending on your age, income or if you are disabled. Transportation can be provided by the government entities such as local city transit authorities, for-profit and non-profit organizations providing small regional bus or van services, or by volunteers serving the community through non-profit organizations.

Good places to start if you are in need of transportation resources:

  1. Call 2-1-1 or visit their website
    2-1-1 is a free and confidential service provided by United Way and funded by community foundations, Federal, state and local governments. The 2-1-1 program serves all ages across the United States. They have lists of transportation resources by geographic area on their website or call them through the 2-1-1 phone number and speak with a trained services professional. Keep in mind that some areas of the country may have fewer or more transportation resources than others.
    Note: The 211.org website lists many other types of resources and services to help people in need.
    Website: www.211.org
  2. Your Local Area Agency on Aging
    Eldercare Locator: 1-800-677-1116 – Monday – Friday, 9AM – 8PM ET
    For older adults, your local Area Agency on Aging can be a referral source for transportation resources and other services that help seniors. Call the Eldercare Locator to find your local agency.
    Note: The Eldercare.gov website has a searchable database that lists information about different types of senior resources and also lists some local resources by state.
    Website: www.Eldercare.gov
  3. Helpful Hints
    When calling to ask for assistance have a notebook handy and take notes on the information you are given. Take the complete name of the person you are speaking with and their title or operator number; have them repeat the phone number you called, the name of agency and their website address. If something sounds too good to be true, then call in a day or two and make sure you get the same information the next time you call. If you are not given the same information, then bring up the previous conversation and try to get clarification. If possible or appropriate, ask for a case number or incident number so that when you call in next, your information can be accessed.
  4. Look at the Organization’s Website
    If you have Internet access, go to the organization’s website and check out their resources online. Often more details about programs are posted on a website than what you can get if you just call the organization.
  5. Access to the Internet
    More and more it is important to have Internet access to look at organizations’ websites. If you do not have a computer at home and Internet access, then you can often find computer and Internet access at libraries, senior centers, and some non-profit organizations offer assistance with Internet access.

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Types of Transportation Resources:

Transportation resources can include the following.

Note: These are topics that you can ask for referrals for from 2-1-1 and your local Area Agency on Aging.

  1. Regional Transportation organizations such as public buses and trains managed by local government.
  2. Non-profit Local Transportation Organizations which may be free or low cost for qualifying riders. Typically they have small buses and vans that serve the community.
  3. Dial-a-ride Organizations offering door-to-door services which may be free or low cost for qualifying riders. Typically they have small buses and vans that serve the community.
  4. Paratransit Options, also known as access-a-ride which is transportation for the disabled and seniors offering door-to-door services on a space available and reservation basis. This type of transportation may be free or low cost for qualifying riders. Typically they have small buses and vans that serve the community.
  5. PACE Organizations that offer all-encompassing care that often includes transportation for their members.
    Website: National Pace Association
  6. Senior Centers may have transportation to bring seniors to the center and then take them home.
  7. Community volunteers offering driving services through organizations such as the Village to Village network or other charitable organizations. Often there is an annual fee to join the village organization and then community volunteers provide services such as a ride to the doctor’s office
  8. Larger non-profits offering transportation such as United Way, American Red Cross, Volunteers of America and Easter Seals to name a few.
  9. Taxi Cab Services which are fee for service for-profit organizations
  10. Medical Transport companies such as ambulance services for transportation needed for medical situations
  11. There are also private pay homemaker-companions provided by organizations that will provide driving services, usually using the senior’s own car to drive them to appointments, errands and personal excursions.

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More Links for Transportation Resources and Information:

Below are links to organizations that offer information about transportation services. This information is background to help you understand transportation services in the United States.

  • American Public Transportation System – CLICK HERE
  • Community Transportation Association – CLICK HERE
  • National Mobility Equipment Dealer’s Association (NMEDA) – CLICK HERE
  • Wheelchair Getaways – CLICK HERE
  • Wheelers – CLICK HERE
  • And in the future – Self-Driving Cars – learn more about self-driving car technology from Google – CLICK HERE

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Other Resources on when an Older Adult should Stop Driving:

Below are links to articles with information on when older adults should stop driving.

  • AARP – Signs that a person should stop driving – CLICK HERE
  • National Institute on Aging – Information about Older Drivers – CLICK HERE
  • Alzheimer’s Association – Dementia and Driving Resource Center – CLICK HERE

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Tags: transportation, regional transit, medical transport, dial-a-ride organizations, access-a-ride, cars, vans, older adults, stop driving,

About Transportation Resources is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NoDerivs 3.0 United States License.

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Posted November 2016 on www.SeniorsResourceGuide.com